swanrād

swanrād

swanrād, ?.n: ‘swan-road’, a kenning for the sea.

Image: British Library, Harley MS 4751, Folio 41v

From The Medieval Bestiary website: ‘The swan has a harmonious voice, with which it pours out a sweet song. In the Hyperborean regions swans are attracted by the sound of a zither or harp and sing along when one is played. The long neck of the swan makes its song more pleasant. The song it sings before it dies is the sweetest of all. Sailors consider the sighting of a swan to be auspicious.’

wæter

wæter

wæter, n.n: water.

Today marks the start of the Museum of Water exhibit at Somerset House, a live artwork by Amy Sharrocks. The Old English Wordhord of King’s College London is coming to the exhibit on Saturday 21 June for our Wæter-hord event, part of Midsummer Water Day, free entry, 12:00-17:30.

@OEWordhord will tweet Old English watery words during the two weeks leading up to the event.

If you have a favourite Old English word related to water (or a watery word you’d like to know how to say in Old English), please tweet it to @OEWordhord using the hashtag #OEwater. These words will be part of our Wæter-hord event on 21 June.  Also, there will be a screen for live-tweeting your #OEwater words on the day, so even if you aren’t in London, you can join us virtually at the event.

Browse the Old English Wordhord’s water words here on the blog.